Spring haiku by Sean Lindsay

Welcome to WIZ’s 2012 Spring Poetry Runoff open invitation haiku chain.   This is a non-competitive (that is, not part of the poetry contest), come-as-you-are,   just-for-fun, community word-dance.

A haiku is a classical Japanese poetical form, usually 17 syllables all in a single line in Japanese, but I understand that there are longer and shorter forms.   In English, a haiku often takes the form of one short line of 5 syllables, a long line of 7 syllables, then another short line of 5 syllables, but there are many paths–pick what pleases you.   Often, haiku mention the season under scrutiny–in this case spring, obviously.   If you wish to learn more about haiku, you can go here or here.

The rules: Really, there aren’t any.   How it usually goes is someone starts the chain.   I invited Sean Lindsay to forge the first link in the chain, as he’s often done here.   Somebody follows him, adding a single haiku in the comments, and then another person takes a turn, and around we go.   Other than the informal, €œone-at-a-time-please € tradition, there’s no limit to turns a participant can take and no deadline for this activity.   It runs as long as it runs.

Sean’s opener:

Earth, ice and stone press
Their cold into warmer skies,
Sublimating snows.

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Sean Lindsay occasionally blogs as greenfrog at www.inlimine.blogspot.com and can sometimes be found onymously puttering around Buddhist rock gardens on facebook.

*non-competition submission*

Spring Haiku by greenfrog

Welcome to WIZ’s Spring Poetry Runoff open invitation haiku chain.   This is a non-competitive (that is, not part of the poetry contest), come-as-you-are,   just-for-fun activity that we run from time to time here on WIZ.

A haiku is a classical Japanese poetical form, usually 17 syllables all in a single line in Japanese, but I understand that there are longer and shorter forms.   In English, a haiku often takes the form of one short line of 5 syllables, a long line of 7 syllables, and a short line of 5 syllables, but there are many paths–take your pick.   Often, haiku mention the season under scrutiny–in this case spring, obviously.   If you wish to learn more about haiku, you can go here or here.

The rules: Really, there aren’t any.   How it usually goes is someone starts the chain–today, it’s Sean aka greenfrog.   Somebody follows him, adding a single haiku in the comments, and then another person takes a turn, and around we go.   Other than the informal, “one-at-a-time-please” tradition, there’s no limit to turns a participant can take and no deadline for this activity.   It runs as long as it runs.   So if you feel inclined to add a thread to the tapestry, don’t be shy.

Here’s Sean’s opening haiku:

The bud embedded
In the matrix of branch and
Earth and sun and spring.

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Sean/greenfrog makes his home in the Denver area and blogs occasionally about yoga and meditation.   You can visit his blog In Limine here.

Snow day and dishwashing haiku

Just as the deep snow here had melted to half-gone and I’d broken usable trails through the month-old snowpack remaining, a new storm blew in, dropped another five or six inches, and undid my hope for a winter thaw.   Two more storms over the next three days are expected to fluff things up even more.   While I work up the energy to go out and re-break trails €”for myself and for animals, on whom this unnaturally long winter has been very stressful €”I thought I’d try something different at WIZ to pass time.

Traditionally, haiku express insight into the movement of a season across the face of a landscape.   But since the form is of a meditative mind, its nature can be stretched to explore particulars of a variety of conditions.   In a recent conversation with greenfrog, topics of awareness and dishwashing flowed together.   The prospect of dishwashing haiku arose.   Well €¦ and why not?

So for WIZ’s next winter while-away open invitation, the name is dishwashing (which I happen to find especially pleasant in wintertime); the game is haiku.

To begin:

Warm tap water, cool
Winter light pouring in streak
Plates in kitchen sync.

Let the One-liners begin.