Thanks to WIZ’s People Month Participants

My happy thanks to everyone who participated in WIZ’s People Month.   My list of folks  for whom I’ve  felt deeply grateful includes:

Th.
Nephi Anderson (via Th.’s gravelly voice)
Mark Bennion
Tyler Chadwick
greenfrog
green mormon architect
Elizabeth R.

And, of course, many thanks to WIZ’s loyal readers and commenters.

I appreciate  each writer’s  help keeping People Month on WIZ interesting and fun.   We’ll do it again next year (maybe earlier), so start drawing up your People Month writing plans now.

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Guest post by Tyler Chadwick: Fruit

by Tyler Chadwick
 

1. First

€œShe’s like an apple
in a water balloon, €
the doctor says. They watch

their fruit unfold across
the screen in light movements.
Submerged beneath her sea

enclosed by silent walls,
slow fluid breaths inspire
her ripening, baptize

the room in innocence.
Within this matrix
of tranquility,

they sense her beckoning
through sound’s translucent waves,
calling from her still place

into time’s raging sea
for a Return. Then Light
ripples from around her world

as from the Garden tree
whence God called Adam
and questioned why his seed
had grown so ripe with blood.

2. Last

Within their yellow tree
atop a falling hill,
shades of spring shadow

the waiting fruit. Chilled rains
stagnate in micro-seas
about their stems, throw drops

of ripened dew across
his face as he climbs
upward, pulls the apples,

and drops them
to her waiting hands.
Pale bruises hide beneath

the golden skin, some from
their gathering, some from
tussles with branches

and hungry birds, and some
from the inside-out
of parasitic guile.

Holding his breath,
he cradles the last fruit
as naked branches steal
the blood from his cold hand.
 

3. Return

The pair, fallen with years,
returns to their garden,
straining for shades of green

within withered gold.
Arm in arm, they step
beneath their tree

and rest against the trunk.
His eyes pursue the land
into a blurry field

and hers cover his face
in reminiscent strokes.
As the sun departs his gaze,

dark winds carry
the breath of swollen fruit,
pooled around their feet. He sighs;

she leans against his arm
and waits with him as night
folds across his frame.

Her tears swell with their fruit,
distilling through Earth’s skin
into the flowing blood
of their generations’ veins.

____________________________________________________________

For Tyler’s bio and blogs, go here (scroll to  the end).  

Originally published in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 39:3 (2006).

Guest post by greenfrog: Iona

It seems strange to think that sitting with what’s left of a woman who second-mothered me most summers and for two school years of my life is yoga, but it was the most heart-opening practice I’ve done.

What’s left? A bag of bones, draped with a thin and mottled fabric of skin. Bits and pieces of the sharp-tongued intellect, the manipulative middle sister, the telecom executive mind, the loving aunt to a dozen or so nieces and nephews.

€œ €¦aaaaaaaaaarrrraaaaaeeeaaaerrammmmaaaarrreeeaa €¦ €

She’s stuck in the middle of a word, intoning it until the breath of the word runs out. She looks at me, confused — unsure of whether it’s the word or her mind or my presence that is out of place, not right.

Eyes look out from deep hollows in her skull, the upper lip drawn up, exposing the greyed and yellowed front teeth. The eyes seem to have shrunk, eyelid skin disappearing under the ocular orbits of her skull, a bottomless crevasse, reappearing hugging the round eye.

How can an eye look uncertainly? Is it the shape of the eyelids? The brows? Hers never move.

A sentence about the dogs she cared for 30 years ago comes out clearly, intoned with the wry sense she used when managing us as kids, telling me of a white dog trying to hide in the greenery of her backyard.

€œeeeeeehhhhhhhaaaaaaaahhhhhhheeeeehhhhhh €

She gets stuck on another word; runs out of breath. Stops to inhale.

Yesterday, the daylight from the window at the head of her bed cast artists’ shadows across her face, framing her skeleton head in a silver halo of clean, frizzy hair. Despite her complaints, the room is clean, the temperature is pleasant, she’s only ten steps from the nurses’ station.

She tried to get out and about on her own a week ago and fell. The scabs and bruises mottle her skin even more than age. She’s got a clear adhesive bandage on a wound on her wrist, too tempting a target for the hen’s pecking instinct, the unwatched fingernails’ primate-picking-grooming instinct.

Yesterday, she was sleepy, drifting off, startling awake when doors closed in the corridor. The light was really perfect for drawing. I had a sketch book in my bag, but I was seated beside her bed, her cool fingers holding my hand. Once when she drifted off, I thought to slip my hand from hers and retrieve my sketchbook. But even a millimeter of movement brought her back awake in a moment. I resisted the sketching urge and held still. I was the one posed.

Today, the light is more muted, as the advance guard of a snowstorm moves into the valley. I can still see the bone shapes in her face, the drooping cloth of her skin lying across the skull, her front teeth protruding from aging, drawn back lips, the weight of her skin draping toward her ears. With a sketch today, I think I could capture the light I saw yesterday.

What’s with this urge to sketch? Just to free my hand, my self from this diminishing biome? Create distance from her, to turn her into an abstraction of darkness and light? Or maybe a desire for the intimacy of drawing someone, my eye touching each edge, each curve, probing each shadow of her face, an intimacy we once shared through words, an intimacy that too many strokes, each cutting off blood to a different fragment of mind, now deny us?

She reaches for my hand again. I receive hers.

She articulates as carefully as she can, €œI would find it quite pleasant if you would remove this bandage, € lifting her bandaged wrist. I tell her that the doctor would be unhappy with me if I did that. We repeat this conversation five or six times during the hour. Sometimes I defer to medical expertise. Sometimes I lie about doing it later. Sometimes I look her in the eye and tell her that I think she’d pick it raw without a bandage. My responses seem to matter more for the sound of my voice than the content of the words. Do I mislead myself that the actual words don’t matter?

I pause to take a breath myself. It doesn’t bring me back to center, but it does stretch, then relax more deeply the intercostal muscles. I’m reminded that I’m the mind of a body. I rest, holding her cool fingers in mine.

Walking back to my car in the parking lot, my heart feels strange, entangled, alive.

____________________________________________________________

For greenfrog’s blog, In Limine, go here.   For  his bio, go here.

Guest post by green mormon architect: 8.3 Million

As the bus exits the Lincoln tunnel and enters Manhattan, I strain my neck to look out the window at the buildings towering over me in the narrow corridor called a street.   I am overwhelmed with awe at the beauty and majesty of this new environment.   I can hear, feel and smell the city breathing with both life and decay.   Steam coming out of the asphalt.   Music coming out of a church.   Rotten food coming out of buildings.   Light coming out of windows.   People walking everywhere.   I am a foreigner here.   Where can I find shelter, or a drink of water?   Where do I push my stick into the landscape, like Brigham, and say this is where I will begin?

I decide to explore this living organism called a city.   Much more seems to be going on here than is visible on the surface.   The landscape before me is teeming with life like a tree, with roots extending deep into the earth and branches soaring into the sky.   Lightning and water flow hidden through arteries giving life to all.   Burrowing under the city’s skin I enter one of the arteries called a subway.   Here I am transported to another time.   As I emerge, not knowing what to expect, my eyes take time to adjust to the changed scene before me.   A person reeking of urine and dressed in rags asks for money.   I get a sandwich from a guy at a deli.   Someone follows me calling out that he knows me, but I’ve never seen him before.   This part of the city is old.   The scale of all I see is different.   Ground Zero lies in ruins.   People around me share where they were when it happened.   There is a wall lining an entire street with flowers and graffiti-like markings.   One of the scrawlings says, €œI sat in silence watching. €   Why are all these people here?

By chance I run into a friend from high school.   I don’t know what to say to him.   He doesn’t say anything, so we pass each other on a piece of concrete called a sidewalk.   How do I make my mark?   How do I make a difference?   I run into a friend from college.   He lives here now.   We talk as though we were not in a foreign place.   I forget that I am the foreigner.

An obsession begins to develop towards this strange wilderness.   I feel at home for the first time in my life even though I am alone.   But I’m not alone.   This vast landscape is layered with people, surfaces, textures, and materials that combine infinitely to provide me the community, music, crime, art, filth, food, and beauty that I need.   Every stranger I pass on the street helps contribute to make each of these parts of my life here possible.     Again I burrow into the city’s skin.

I emerge reborn, now a child of the city, confident.   I am ready to begin.   I know where in the landscape to place my stick.   I enter a box called an elevator and fly upwards, unseen, as high as is humanly possible, to the top of an Empire.   Here I stand on stones carved out of the earth by human hands.   These stones suspended 1250 feet above the street allow me to see the grandest achievements of Humanity.   It is February 14th at midnight.   Sleepless in Seattle comes to mind.   Except my love is not coming for me.   My love is already here, all 8.3 million of them.

____________________________________________________________

Jonathan is an architect and blogger who loves talking about sustainability, the environment, buildings, and cities.    He has  worked in Orlando, San Francisco, Portland, and now Salt Lake where  he is  approaching one year in Utah working for the LDS Church.    He blogs at green mormon architect and salt lake architecture and  is looking forward to a return trip to New York next month.

Feeling the life week on WIZ

If you’re doing the human being thing with any gusto, you’ve more than likely experienced moments of awakening, of not only feeling more alive yourself but of feeling the lives of others around touching your life, dancing through, affecting and changing who you are, entwining into your being (you can read about some of my awakenings here).   In my opinion, you can’t wind too deeply into life.   And no matter how deeply you do ravel, greater depths and more intricate braiding patterns remain.   If you learn them, they  weave you into a lively tapestry that changes nearly every breath you take.

This week on WIZ we’re celebrating that heady condition of feeling the life that you are and the life of others around, be they strangers or loved ones.   We’re singing songs of  relishing being alive  and of maturing through levels and stages of life.   Have fun, and readers, please feel free to raise in the comments your own thoughts about what it means to feel alive or to face the challenges that  circumstances have presented to your feeling as alive as you desire.

Let’s see what we can make of this third week of August 2009.